Marjorie Gould, “Moving Spirit”

Marjorie and her older brother Russell Gould.

Marjorie and her older brother Russell Gould.

My great aunt Marjorie Gould was volunteering for the Bayonne Red Cross during the Spanish Flu Epidemic in 1918 when she caught the flu and died suddenly.  She had just graduated from Syracuse University the year before in 1917.

Marjorie was born in Bayonne, NJ, on Sept. 30, 1893. She was the favorite younger sister of my grandfather J. Howard Gould, who was five years older. Marjorie was the youngest of seven children of George and Lina Treadwell Gould who lived on Avenue C in Bayonne.  She graduated from Bayonne High School and was a member of the United Methodist Church near her home.

As a child, she was an avid reader and writer. Several letters from her are published in St. Nicholas Magazine, a famous children’s magazine of the era.

St. Nicholas Magazine

She wrote a beautiful diary of her visit to her older brother at the University of Pennsylvania, which my mother has in her possession.

She also played tennis.  Family.MarjorieGould

At Syracuse, she made the most of her opportunities. She was a member of many organizations. She was the advertising manager of the Daily Orange newspaper, she volunteered with factory workers with the YMCA. She sang as a soprano in the Syracuse University Chorus. She was a member of a sorority, and chairman of the Religious Organization, and more. family.marjoriegould.syracuse2

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Family.MarjorieandMama

Marjorie (left) and Mabel Black Gould, wife to Marjorie’s brother J. Howard, at the Jersey Shore.

As Marjorie volunteered with flu victims that fall of 1918, my grandfather J. Howard was also treating patients in Bayonne. He caught the flu and became seriously ill, but recovered. She died on Oct. 22, 1918. In her obituary in the Bayonne newspaper, it is written: “She was loved by all who knew her. She was the moving spirit of many enterprises for the benefit of others.”

 

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